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7 mois ago · by · 0 comments

« La sanità non è solo costi »

Costi della sanità, ospedali contro il governo

Il dibattito deve vertere anche sulla qualità e mettere al centro dell’attenzione il paziente, afferma l’associazione degli ospedali

Il dibattito sui costi sanitari dovrebbe vertere sulla qualità, mettendo il paziente al centro dell’attenzione, e non sul solo aspetto finanziario.

Lo afferma l’associazione degli ospedali, delle cliniche e delle case di cura che, martedì a Berna, ha criticato in particolare la situazione relativa alle tariffe ambulatoriali e i non appropriati interventi della Confederazione in quest’ambito.

L’attuale « TARMED », i punti critici nelle disposizioni tariffali della LAMal, la legge federale sull’assicurazione malattie, e le differenze nel finanziamento di prestazioni ambulatoriali e stazionarie rendono difficile agire in modo efficiente.

ATS/dg martedì 22/05/18

http://health-insurance-switzerland.ch

http://assurance-maladie-economique.ch

http://cassa-malati-economica.ch

How can health insurance in Switzerland be made cheaper?

Over the last two decades, the cost of health insurance has gone up an average of 3.7 percent per year in Switzerland and people are well and truly fed up.

Health insurance costs are a hot topic in Switzerland right now. Speak to anyone in the country about what concerns them most and they are likely to mention rising premiums.

“It’s two to midnight,” said Swiss price watchdog Stefan Meierhans recently, describing the current situation. Meanwhile the CEO of health insurance Santésuisse said the system was “gradually approaching collapse”.

Because while almost everyone agrees Switzerland has fantastic healthcare, it comes at a high price. Healthcare costs in 2015 were equal to 12.1 percent of GDP, or second only to the United States, OECD figures show.

It’s same story for per capita spending: Switzerland is set to spend 10,500 francs per person for healthcare in 2018 this year, according to the KOF Swiss Economic Institute at Zurich’s ETH University. Only the US spends more.

These costs are rocketing skywards too – around four percent a year, says the KOF institute.

“The Swiss health system is like an unguided missile. It behaves like a junkie that needs more and more money all the time,” health economist Heinz Locher told Swiss newspaper Blick recently, before calling for the current system to be completely overhauled.

While Switzerland is not alone in this – many developed countries are seeing ballooning healthcare costs as they deal with ageing populations and increased expectations of what healthcare can provide – the Swiss situation is exacerbated by the fact only 64 percent of health funding is publicly financed.

Compulsory insurance

Swiss people fund around a third of all the country’s healthcare costs though a compulsory insurance system. When you get a bill in the mail every month, health care costs are very real.

To make matters worse, the cost of premiums for this obligatory insurance have shot up twice as fast as GDP and wages since 1996. Out-of-pocket expenses, or the amount people have to pay before health insurance kicks in, have climbed steadily too.

And with 22 percent of Swiss people saying in 2016 they went without necessary medical care because of costs, there is no question something needs to be done.

Fewer hospitals, more generic medicines

Many of the ideas being proposed to cut costs – an increased use of generic medicines, for example – have been floating around for a while.

But a heated recent debate has thrown up a few surprises.

“What’s new in the current debate is that previously ‘managed competition’ has been the order of the day when it comes to Swiss healthcare,” Simon Wieser a health economist who heads up the Institute of Health Economics at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW) told The Local recently.

“Now we are even seeing centrist political parties talking about caps, like the Christian Democratic Party (CVP) with its Kostenbremse (cost brake) initiative,” he added, referring to a proposal that would see increases in health insurance premiums more closely tied to economic and wage growth.

The CVP’s proposal – which is light on details – also called on doctors and hospitals to avoid “overtreatment” of patients either through medications or surgery.

“It’s probably correct that we are seeing some overtreatment. There is an incentive to provide ambulatory care,” said Weiser on this point.

“What’s new in the current debate is that previously ‘managed competition’ has been the order of the day when it comes to Swiss healthcare,” Simon Wieser a health economist who heads up the Institute of Health Economics at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW) told The Local recently.

“Now we are even seeing centrist political parties talking about caps, like the Christian Democratic Party (CVP) with its Kostenbremse (cost brake) initiative,” he added, referring to a proposal that would see increases in health insurance premiums more closely tied to economic and wage growth.

The CVP’s proposal – which is light on details – also called on doctors and hospitals to avoid “overtreatment” of patients either through medications or surgery.

“It’s probably correct that we are seeing some overtreatment. There is an incentive to provide ambulatory care,” said Weiser on this point.

“At the same time, if you have a hospital and you want a good hospital director and good doctors, you have to offer them the chance to carry out a variety of procedures,” he added, explaining why the same treatments are often offered at hospitals close to each other.

Wieser noted however, that the canton of Zurich had introduced “minimum caseload requirements” as a way to address this oversupply. Theses requirements ensure hospitals are suitably prepared to carry out certain procedures.

“This is a step in the right direction,” he said.

But it is another suggestion from the economist that move prove a bridge too far: “This is a difficult one too, because it is hard to ask doctors to earn less money – but some doctor’s incomes are very high.”

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